The Best Apps to Run a Startup From Your Phone – WSJ

The recent story in the WSJ about the best apps to run a startup from your phone with is certainly a smile-inducing title. If only there was an app for smart hiring that didn’t screen scrap until they get it working (I mean really), business model canvassing, and accurately predicting market trends.

All of these applications and sites are wonderful and they do allow us to be far more efficient which then allows more time to what really matters whether it be a startup or a legacy company. This brought me to consider the apps/sites I most relied on in my past three workplaces: my consulting days at JD Laboratories, my enterprise IT days, and my current small company product days.

JD Laboratories – Time and Materials / Projects

The key here was project tracking, time tracking, and invoicing. I used Quickbooks for my P&L, financial reporting, and invoicing. I used Paymo to track my time and then generate the monthly statements that feed into quickbooks as my T&M clients were billed monthly.

When I worked on a project basis I initially used basecamp from 37Signals as I was a junkie of their blog, into Ruby on Rails, and they had the best offering. However, my clients didn’t like logging into their system which led me to adopt Trello which I have brought with me everywhere since. I trust their are better systems than Trello when doing feature assessments but at the end of the day I always go with simplicity and actual use before graduating to something more specific and complex.

And my long-term client Mix & Burn used FogBugz for issue tracking which was nice because of tie-ins with our IDE although the UX was sluggish at the time.

Enterprise IT

Enterprise IT certainly brought challenges when coming from my own shop and that was actually part of the allure. Small hurdles were not having the credit card initially and firewall rules for external systems. I was able to bring in Trello for my personal project tracking and then used Jira and Confluence with a new technical team I built focused on enterprise integration. Confluence was wonderful for publishing the standards and practices of our restful API’s as our product support teams could easily see them and we could export them for vendors that were integrating our APIs with their vendor systems.

We also used an agile-ish project management tool that was a $1 a seat; it was a short experiment.

SetSight – SaaS

For SetSight the focus has to be on easy as the history has been a bit of a gunslinger mythos with inconsistent processes so we can use something very rigid. So I brought in Trello to do the product backlog and sprint management. Trello has numerous external plugins that offer sprint scoring, estimating, charting, and reports. My favorite is Plus for Trello. For issue management we use TeamSupport and their is some clamoring for Jira. I think Jira is great but from a process perspective we are at the point we were need to get better at what we do and sometimes there is the perception that the tool will fix bad behavior; I say fix bad behavior first.

From a dev perspective we moved to Git from Svn to improve future tie-ins with external build and testing systems. We have yet to do automated testing and continuous deployments since we’ve moved to AWS but are well on our way.

Source: The Best Apps to Run a Startup From Your Phone – WSJ

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